jaydinitto.com

Blog About UX Has Really Bad UX

I recently subscribed to a bunch of blogs that deal with UX trends and best practices. One of those blogs is one on the Mockplus product site, which is a prototyping tool for web apps.

Normally I access my subscriptions on my phone, through the Feedly app. 90% of the those times, I don’t hit the actual post URL in a browsers since most blogs set their RSS broadcasters to deliver all of the post content. Mockplus only broadcasts a summary, so I have to load up the URL.

Here was the first post from the Mockplus blog I saw in Chrome for Android. Note the paradox when you compare the experience to the post title.

Also note there is no way to close the imposing ad, so you have to scroll through the entire post while the ad persists. I squinted so hard trying to read the post that my eyebrows popped off.

Here’s my experience on the desktop version of Chrome. The interstitial ad is still there, and though it covers a bit of the content, there’s a way to close it.

I’m in the UX camp of “no interstitial flow” unless the user prompts it, and less than 30 seconds would normally be spent inside it. No surprise ads while the user is reading; that would never happen if I had full decision-making—especially no full-page ads. I’m waiting for the news story about one of those causing a heart attack.

I’d also like to make it clear to the user that they’d be launching an interstitial, but I don’t think there’s good iconography language around that. The language that does exist for meta-navigation is currently being taken up by communicating external links, uploading and downloading, etc. That sort of thing would have to come from a big UX influencer if it were to catch on at all.

Really Old Newspaper Clippings

These clippings are from a newspaper called The Boston Sunday Advertiser, from February 15, 1931. It was a small society-type newspaper that had articles on theater shows and various local events, stories, comics, contests, etc. The front page story on Washington and Lincoln seemed out of place.

I had thought this was the Sunday version of the The Boston Daily Advertiser, but that stopped publication a decade earlier. So I have no idea really what this is.

Here’s the front page. I guess Lincoln was asleep for this portrait:

An ad for weight loss. I’ll bet this never worked, but at least they let you try it out:

An other scammy product. The only thing these were lucky for were sticking things onto your refrigerator:

To give you an idea on these prices, $10 in 1931 is roughly $155 in 2017. So really, these prices aren’t too different now:

One of the most poorly-conceived company names:

I think “rupturing” is an old term, relating to a woman’s monthly friend. I Googled around for but I didn’t feel like going too deep:

“Piles” is a polite term for “hemorrhoids.” God help you if you maneuvered that twisty thing up there:

An illustration that accompanied a short story. It’s a great picture, de-contextualized:

Microfiction existed back then:

And more:

Unintentional Name Glyph Length Accuracy

Original, cringe-worthy, video here, about some limp noodles from BuzzFeed and their t-count test results.

But the important thing is that the UX design centers of my brain were delighted that the width dimension of their names matched their comparative testosterone level results with ridiculous accuracy:

Links of Possible Relevance, Part 29

Jay DiNitto – LinkedIn Profile
Don’t click that link—it’s broken. I took my deleted my profile since I saw no point in it.

“Old Life In Your Way stuff” YouTube playlist
I uploaded a bunch of old material from my old band, with varying production quality. The videos I play on are the “Skies Broke Open” one and The Heart and Flesh Cry Out EP. My wife and I also do the claps on the last song on their 2006 demo, but that isn’t an official track.

Expert: Don’t wait until AC unit breaks
Thanks to Graham for the link. Even professional philosophers need proper UX design.

SUPERVERSIVE: The Missed Opportunity of “Jessica Jones”
Why Death Note takes the cake in the cat and mouse crime genre face-off vs. Jessica Jones.

Free State explains R40m website
38 websites that cost about 40 million Rands ($2.8 million). I could do it for half that amount in the same time; they are all WordPress-based. Little to no backend coding needed.

Masayoshi Son, CEO of SoftBank: Robots will have an IQ of 10,000
I get what he’s saying, but I don’t think IQ tests really measure that high. After, I don’t know, a 200 IQ or so, does it really matter how high it is?

Anti-togetherness: The Virtues of Disunity
“On ideological grounds we imagine a world that cannot exist, and try to move into it. When it doesn’t work, we try to force it.”

Wigle Tasting Room
I walk by this place often on the way to work. Lord help us if this is the new bourgeois hipster trend; whiskey is fermented garbage juice. But I also like black bitter coffee that will grow hair on a baby’s backside.

An Islamic “Reformation”? – Pseudo History meets Politics
Current status: satisfied that the snobbery of moderns in thinking we are the “greatest because we’re the latest” is an actual fallacy—The Whig Fallacy. Sometimes I think Victorianism is worse than the Enlightenment as far as intellectual eras.

Hipster Miyazaki Hated Weinstein Before It Was Popular
“Miyazaki sent him a samurai sword in the post. Attached to the blade was a stark message: ‘No cuts.'”

Human Minds Prefer Survival More Than Truth

1. Per Plantinga, and some forms of natural selection, ceteris paribus, life selects for organisms that adapt towards survival cues, not for truth. Plantinga frames this as an argument against evolutionary naturalism. This is not false, but could be true in other cases than have nothing to do with theism.

2. The survival vs truth dichotomy is exaggerated, however, since there are many, if not most, factors that both satisfy survival and truth criteria. Bartering the correct number of bushels of strawberries for the correct quarter of cow ensures my survival because it involves food and mathematically falls within the going rate of strawberry-bushels-to-meat in the local market—both survival and (arithmetical) truth criteria are satisfied.

3. Additionally, in this bartering scenario, there is a runoff benefit of social stability because both sides of the transaction are gaining something, don’t feel as though they are being cheated, etc. This nudges the even more towards survival benefits than truth benefits.

4. The “meat” of the survival vs truth Venn diagram is biggest when we can confirm phenomena that are falsifiable, which favors first-hand sensory accounts over most other ways of gaining knowledge. I may make a habit of relieving myself in Swamp A instead of Swamp B because my parents told me there are hungry alligators in Swamp B. I definitely survive by gracing Swamp A with my unwanted matter, yet the truth of Swamp B’s alligatorness is undetermined until I begin to take frequent slashes into Swamp B and determine there are no alligators at all. I still survive and know a bit of truth, though the truth was irrelevant to my survival.

5. The “meat” gets skinnier and skinnier—the truth and survival protocols (diagram circles) separate more and more—as the epistemic certainty of an event goes down. News of civilian unrest a village over from Town A would more likely cause folks to prepare for possible conflict, though its likelihood of conflict spreading to Town A is not likely or impossible.

6. To continue with this analogy, those in Town A who are epistemically convinced that they are safe from a spreading conflict may “join in” in preparing for a defense on the border, since not doing so could cause internecine conflict in Town A. In such a case, survival cues can be met over truth cues at multiple levels.

7. However, adherence to truth cues can overcome survival cues, if the person holds to a certain truth (with its consequences) to such a degree that it acts as an epistemic defeater for survival. This is most notable in political and religious martyrdom. The saint or revolutionary holds his truth and its consequences strongly enough to maintain them through bodily harm. Thus, there can be some truths that can produce great enough sentiment to risk not just social ostracism but death. This is seen in a less dramatic degree in the conservative professor who has to keep his political beliefs hush-hush to avoid being targeted, or the atheist going to church with his highly-religious family on Sundays.

8. Truth, therefore, is less important to individual survival than survival cues—though that is tautological. In cases where interpersonal social bonds are more crucial to survival—probably more in societies where there is less labor-saving technology. Thus, we can see that beliefs of remote phenomena, like national politics, are more oriented with interpersonal agreement—”we vote party A in this town because party B is xyz and that’s not in our best interests”—even though party B is not xyz at all. The social bonds created in voting for part A and maligning party B are stronger than the bonds created in voting according to the truth.

9. This phenomena is likely more prevalent the further away the people and events in question are, and unrelated to the technological level the society enjoys, since the truth about the phenomena after a certain epistemic distance is unknowable. Example conclusion from this: 100% of any news report of a national political event or politician have nothing to truth but can be used a social bonding mechanism.

Links of Possible Relevance, Part 28

Japanese-style public service ads in LA metro
Cute, but it feels the novelty could wear off quick.

The real reason why network ‘neutrality’ is impossible
Interesting technical reasons why this idea is a nightmare. It will cause shortages of service, just like every other time bureaucrats try to make things “fair.”

Twitter is done with hate symbols and violent groups
Twitter clutches its pearls.

Brie Larson on Twitter: “I merely smiled at a TSA agent and he asked for my phone number. To live life as a woman is to live life on the defense.”
Via Jill. What hath feminism wrought? Paranoid, intolerable Victorianites. Peasants cannot spake suchly to the aristocracy!

Here’s why a 45-foot tall nude sculpture may be coming to the National Mall
Can you believe it’s a silly political statement?

Sci-fi interfaces | IxD Lessons from Sci-Fi
A site I wish I knew about sooner.

Blade Runner Black Out 2022
A nicely-executed short story animation.

Former Hollywood Insider Speaks Out About Sexual Corruption
I dig (a few) movies, but morally, Hollywood is a neverending dumpster fire. It’s safe to assume there’s plenty worse that goes on that we don’t know about, if this scandal is one of the public ones.

COLUMBUS NEVER CAME TO AMERICA
I also dig native American (or whatever they’re supposed to be called) culture, but they are nowhere near the noble angels they’ve been reputed to be.

Review: Blade Runner 2049

Minor spoilers ahoy.

Blade Runner 2049 is getting ridiculously high ratings, which disturbed me because people like a lot of crap I don’t like and I’m in general agreement with these ratings. What to do? Subconsciously (or not), a lot of the praise may be from the visuals, which isn’t an off-the-mark assessment since films are a primarily visual storytelling medium, and these visuals are apparent in the trailers and such. To that end, the cinematography is perfection; every shot is a perfect cut diamond-angle shot of beauty, and director Denis Villeneuve lets those diamond-visuals breathe by not spraying dialogue and distracting you from feeling the moment. This might be the reason for its 265 minute length: cutting it down to the talky, expositional scenes would make it more compact but far less better to look at.

Set 30 years after the original, there are newer-better-stronger waves of replicants (artificial humans) that have been created, legally, after they had been banned for some time. Ryan Gosling, doing the best (and appropriate to the role) resting asshole face for nearly the entire movie, is a replicant working for the LAPD, who hunts down expired replicants and retires—kills—them. Why a kill switch was never installed in these replicants when they are manufactured is never explained, to my knowledge. The explanatory text in the beginning states that the newer replicants have an open-ended lifespan, but that doesn’t excuse the creators for not implanting a “die immediately, sucker” function, controlled by authorities, that will off a wayward replicant from a safe distance. I’m sure a writer could come up with a good technical reason for the switch’s nonexistence.

The plot, aside from this setting, isn’t a new nut: there’s mysterious box found buried at an expired replicant’s property, and it holds secrets that could “blow the whole thing wide open” if it were made public. This is standard fare for thrillers, but its sci-fi patina absolves Hampton Fancher
and Michael Green, the screenwriters, from wrongdoing. Being connected in every way to the original no doubt helps with this absolution. As lauded as the original Blade Runner was, it was still a gumshoe-noir caper set in the future. I disagree that it “explored what it means to be human,” any more than The Maltese Falcon did, and that’s not bad, and I disagree that a film has to be “deep” to be good, or even enjoyable. Blade Runner stylishly plopped you down in this possible scenario with some really realistic androids and let the audience figure out the philosophical implications. That’s probably the preferred way, if a writer or director wants to go that route, to ask fundamental questions than explicating it like we’re born yesterday*.

Here we go, about that philosophy. There was one scene that really injected a thematic point, out of nowhere it seemed to me, that showed a rallying of unretired replicants to “gain acceptance” in wider human society. We are lead to believe, as modern cinema goes, that replicants are stand-ins for whichever oppressed demograhic the viewer feels fills that role in the real world. This plot element actually demonstrates something about stories in general, and cinema specifically: that stories hijack the human’s installed empathy firmware to create an emotional attachment to an unreal person. Film is much more devious in this way because we have the sight and sound of real humans on screen to dial the effect’s signal strength. The characters on screen aren’t human, they are simply images and sounds of humans doing human things, but our brains’ system processes under the hood haven’t been oriented to consciously distinguish between senses that pick up on humans within our immediate physical plane, and humans elsewhere. We know a film’s event aren’t real, logically, but our empathy centers don’t don’t travel those circuits to pick up on that information, which is why we can feel sympathy for, for instance, victims of a natural disaster upon hearing even basic news about them. We recreate the possible disaster scenario in our imagination centers, not unlike a movie running in our heads, and establish an attachment to how someone might feel in that scenario. Again, logically-speaking, the scenario may not even be close to what actually happened, but our sentiments don’t parse and don’t care; they need to attach themselves to something, and this imagination-movie is the closest thing available. In this same way, replicants can use this phenomenon in their struggle, because with replicants there is no uncanny valley as, aside from an odd personality and a small number visible underneath their bottom-right eyelid, they are indistinguishably close to real humans as anything else.

*This was kind of a pun on replicants being “born” as ostensible adults. I couldn’t really make it funny or fully sensible.

Crowdsourcing: Anyone Know What This Camera Effect Is?

You can see it a few times in the Sherlock Holmes clip, the first one, at the 1:37 and 1:50 – 1:54 marks, and also some parts during the fighting scenes after that. It seems the same effect is used in the second video below, from Elysium, but to a much milder degree, from 0:35 – 0:42—right after Good Will Hunting blows Chappie up a few times.

It’s like the focus of the camera is trained onto one spot or area at the center, and the movement kind of warps around it.

I have no practical reason for figuring out the name. Just sheer curiosity. It’s hard to Google anything accurate when I barely know any basic terminology.

About That Band Playing During the Las Vegas Shooting

There’s been more than a few things written about Jason Aldean, the pop-country artist that played during the recent Las Vegas shooting incident, that has passed in front of my eyes. Some of the more notable things written involve Aldean, his band, and/or the production crew being willing conspirators in the shooting, or at least acting incompetently. These sentiments is dumber than a truckload of broken pink hammers, and I’ll explain why.

Source: I have played in zillions of bands, played zillions of live shows, seen zillions of bands play, and have intermediate knowledge of how basic live production works.

1. Bands, playing live, have next to no knowledge of what’s going on off the stage. They may see people, people’s heads, and maybe a red exit sign or two in the back, but mostly they see bright lights in their face. Additionally, they have no mental energy to spare bothering to figure out what’s going on offstage, since they are concentrating on not screwing up. A vocalist might have more of a perspective, if he’s not tied down with an instrument or a mic stand, but only very little more. In Aldean’s case, he is high-profile enough to have a large live budget, so he and the band will only know something weird is going down through their ear monitors, and it will probably be a stage manager or, at the very least, the soundboard tech letting him know.

2. If there’s a possible security issue occurring, the first people to react are floor security, and they’re not going to be looking at nearby buildings for a shooter. Just like the Spanish Inquisition, no one is expecting a shooter at a live music event; the most dangerous “attacks” that happen at those events are the drunk guys passing out face down on the house floor. Security on the audience floor—those on the perimeter and the ones in the “pit” between the audience and the stage—are focused 100% on the audience members, and since they are “first responders,” they are the ones who walkie-talkie the crew, the lighting guy included, if something big enough to warrant a full stop to the show. In this case, security saw commotion in the audience and responded appropriately.

3. Given 1 and 2, it’s likely Aldean and the band were the last ones who knew what was going on. The band probably got a “cut” command in their monitors (you hear the music kinda peter out and stop), and the audience-facing stage lights went on because of the commotion in the audience, which is standard ops. The lighting guy wasn’t “lighting up” the audience so the shooter could see potential targets a little better, neither are production crews genius Navy Seal sharpshooter detectives, who are thinking or acting like Jason Statham when a crisis goes down.

Two New Javascript Projects Done

A mostly boring, semi-technical post…on the Internet, no less. I have two new Javascript projects done up at GitHub.

randomNumberGenerator (repository here)
Returns an array of numbers, chosen from a range. Granted, plenty of other developers have done this, but I wanted the mental exercise of coding it myself. I found myself needing random numbers for coding projects when they come about, and it pays to not have to repeat yourself.

workoutRandomizer (repository here)
Randomizes workout moves from a Javascript object. Easy to customize, even if you don’t really know Javascript object syntax and aren’t afraid of tinkering with source code. Something a little more practical, and something I actually use whenever I work out.