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abounding with verbosity

The Jay Test

Facebook friend Mike Duran posted about the Bechdel Test on his wall recently. I had never heard of it, but I’m happy to report any conversation between women appearing in Pale Blue Scratch fails the test. Well, not exactly happy; I’m really indifferent toward it. However, I don’t play the gender culture war and I don’t acknowledge finger-wagging moralists (looking at you, feminists and MRAs). That something I create might fail a silly test of one side is icing on the cake.

So, as a modest proposal, I offer my own test: the Jay Test (working title…I’m not that conceited, and “Jay Test” is easy to remember). Here it is, called out via the glorious h2 HTML tag:

A story passes the Jay Test if 90% of all the casualties in violent conflicts that occur in said story are female casualties.

I use 90% because of the non-academic estimate on my part—90% of all deaths in narratives seem to be male deaths. The “male death” ratio is heavily skewed by war films and books, simply because wars produce the greatest number of deaths. There are other genres—horror, for example—where the deaths aren’t as one sided, but the death count isn’t nearly as high.

For the record, not only does Pale Blue Scratch fail the Bechdel Test, it fails the Jay Test, too. Spectacularly. Lots of dudes dying in that book. No ladies.

EDIT: To tie this into Star Wars, as is the subject of this blog lately, see this video*. It’s a little flabbergasting to me, that a half-naked (attractive) female has a parent so riled up, when in the Star Wars prequels, there are damn well over 4 million cloned men, created specifically to fight and die in battle. The clones were also “conditioned to be absolutely obedient.” If Star Wars has a sexism issue, it’s this one. As I said, I don’t care about this…creating a clone army of men makes perfect sense, since men are more drawn to perform physical violence, etc. I’m using this example via reasoning by another framework, not my own.

* Interesting point about Leia’s slave outfit: it’s supposed to be demeaning. That Jabba stuck her in one is within his character, and the nature of owning another person. You’re not going to give a slave, male or female, a crown and scepter, are you?

EDIT 2: I’m retracting my perfect failure score for the Jay Test, for Pale Blue Scratch. There’s a scene were some people die, but it’s not explicit that it’s only men. In my mind, there were women involved. Also, “casualty” should be more defined if the test were to be administered. Is it just deaths, or can physical injury count? If it’s the latter, a female character in PBS gets injured often, almost critically.

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6 thoughts on “The Jay Test”

  1. Ed Hurst

    Though I dislike Vox Day, he is right about some things. One of those things is that, whatever “gender equality” might actually mean, it does not equate to “interchangeable.” Portray a real man in society and the only women who actually hate you are those whose interest you rebuff.

    Reply

    1. Jay DiNitto

      Agreed about Vox Day. He has value even if one completely disagrees with him, since he has zero filter. He can afford to be. Let’s get it all out on the table; it saves time. Some people, though, have no idea how to respond because they’ve never been challenged so baldly before.

      Reply

  2. entropyismygod

    @ Jay and Ed

    Ed Hurst “Though I dislike Vox Day”

    Jay “Agreed about Vox Day”

    So neither of you like him but you both admit at least on some things he tells the truth. Why do you hate the truth?

    Reply

    1. Jay Post author

      It’s simple: I agree with him on some things but not others. This “hatred” of truth I seem to have is a non sequitur.

      Reply

  3. Pingback: » Links of Possible Relevance, Part 22

  4. Pingback: » Alien: Covenant Nearly Passes the Jay Test

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